88 very British phrases that will confuse anybody who didn’t grow up in the UK

Anna Chui Anna is a communication expert and a life enthusiast. Full Bio British slang is a niche of its own, evolving and transforming and adapting from city to city and from year to year, just as the English language itself has done. While American slang has become nearly universal with the influx of TV shows, films, and other media filling the screens of a significant majority of the media-viewing global population, there is so much more available once you dig beneath the surface of British slang terms and can discover some real gems beneath the surface. British slang is a niche of its own, evolving and transforming and adapting from city to city and from year to year, just as the English language itself has done. Can also mean to pass something with flying colors. All To Pot Slightly more of an outdated version, this British slang term is still used, and its meaning remains relevant today. In the past it was regarded as a swearword but now, due to its common usage, it is generally acceptable. It is often used as an expression of anger or is used to emphasize a comment. For those unaware, the expression essentially used in the end of a series of basic instructions.

Southern Slang Dictionary

Breast enhancement by plastic surgery. I’ve just made a classic booboo”. A tight, strapless top worn by females that is a basic tube of material.

Sweaty Sock – Jock referring to a Scottish man – insulting Sweeney Todd – Flying Squad The Sweeney was a big TV police series in the s Syrup syrup of fig – wig leading to ‘golden syrup’ meaning a really awful wig ta-ta – au revoir – goodbye.

Sweaty Sock – Jock referring to a Scottish man – insulting Sweeney Todd – Flying Squad The Sweeney was a big TV police series in the s Syrup syrup of fig – wig leading to ‘golden syrup’ meaning a really awful wig ta-ta – au revoir – goodbye. Au revoir is French for goodbye. Note this particular rhyming slang is not substantiated and is included here purely for its interest value in having possible cockney rhyming slang connections or influence. Ta-ta meaning au revoir and goodbye via rhyming slang is suggested or inferred by some sources to be a possible origin or contributory factor in the development of the ta-ta or tar-tar slang for goodbye.

The precise origins of ta-ta and similar variations, such as tatty-bye, are unknown, and the cockney rhyming link is not proven and likely to remain merely a possibility. Ta-ta meaning goodbye was first recorded in Ta-ta has other possible links with the theatrical expression, normally shown as ta-dah. Ta-ta is also mainly linked with nursery slang because it is easier for very young children to say than goodbye.

The Best of British

Bunce, that this is an abbreviation of the word “gasoline” – a word previously used for fuel. Gas in the U. Some gases can be bottled and used for such things as cooking.

You would go to a do if you were going to a party in the UK.

US Any combat hat that does not provide protection. A Boonie hat brig rat US Navy and Marines Describes a sailor or Marine who often frequents the brig military jail , typically as a prisoner. US Air Force Anything that is broken or needing repair or maintenance. Used in the similar sense that you mop with a mop, hence, you broom with a broom. When the Air Force became independent, ‘black’ shoes replaced the ‘brown’ shoes worn by the Army at that time.

US Navy Things and people related to the naval aviation community. From the time when brown shoes were authorized only for aviation ratings and officers.

List of words having different meanings in American and British English (A–L)

Effingpot Slang Also on Twitter and Facebook!. Ace – If something is ace it is awesome. I used to hear it a lot in Liverpool.

Slash – Something a lager lout might be seen doing in the street after his curry – having a slash.

So I ran up the apples, got straight on the dog to me trouble and said I couldn’t believe me mincers. For example, the word “Aris” is often used to indicate the buttocks. This is the result of a double rhyme, starting with the original rough synonym “arse”, which is rhymed with “bottle and glass”, leading to “bottle”. OR , and so that a scholarly selection of examples appears. You can help by adding to it.

January The use of rhyming slang has spread beyond the purely dialectal and some examples are to be found in the mainstream British English lexicon and internationally,[ citation needed ] although many users may be unaware of the origin of those words. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. This section possibly contains original research.

Common UK Expressions & Slang

An easy task is a “doddle. To “faff” is to waste time doing very little. A “fag end” is also the ratty bits towards the ends of a reel of fabric, which are the worst and the cheapest bits of the reel. Historically, “fags” were the cheaper cigarettes made of lower grade tobacco, however, the slang has spread to encompass all cigarettes. However, there is no proof for this theory. Do you know anyone that might be interested?

Pony and trap – crap.

I had an ace time at Jeff’s party! I ran into a wall today, and felt like an ace. Said in a very excited moment, when there is just nothing else to say. From poker, where the best hand is five aces. That gorgeous babe over there just asked me for your phone number. To eat foreign food. Let’s achecanantooch all night! The pain you feel in your eyes after looking at a screen for ages. Acheye is really setting in now; but, boy, is this screen entertaining.

Used when a conversation is boring, to stir excitement or some type of response, using follow by something like Oh, all the silence is making me sneeze. Oh, Bless me, I’m allergic to silence. A varation of the word actually; a poor pronunciation of actually, often caused by speaking too fast. I achuwie am getting too excited.

Definition of tight

Keyser, and may not be used in whole or part without permission. People use it anyway, it’s all over the web – when you see it, think of me. Please report it to me. Aba-daba — Any dessert served in the cookhouse. Advance — Teams of employees traveled ahead of the circus route to put up posters and arrange for advertising, often visiting each town several times four weeks, two weeks and one week before the show.

Or anyone’s rear end, or jail.

Spoken English Phrasal Verbs Lesson 7 – Different ways to use “hook up”